Frequently Asked Questions

Fast charging can be achieved by purchasing a 240 volt level 2 EV charger.   This will provide for a 32 amp charging current (7.4kW power delivery per hour) or 40 amp charging current (9.6 kW power delivery per hour), which can reduce charge times from 10-12 hours down to 3-4 hours depending on the size of your battery.

For rapid charging at selected public charging stations, the cable will always be tethered to the charge point, looking a bit like a traditional gas pump. Your car will be fitted with either a separate socket or a special dual socket for taking this type of charge, which is a DC current.

Latest U.S. Electric Vehicle charge speed times and costs of charging

One of the most popular EV charger-related questions we receive is which is the right EV charger and how much will an EV charge cost if I use that EV charger.  With the introduction in 2021, 2022, and 2023 of a large number of all-electric EVs such as the Kia EV6, the Hyundai Ioniq 5, the Ford Mach-E, the Nissan Ariya, and the Volkswagen ID.4, this has become a hot topic.

When choosing a new EV charger for a new EV or replacement chargers for a broken EV, there are some key considerations.  This is especially true for pure electric vehicles such as more recent full electric models that have hit the market such as the Kia Niro EV, Kia EV 6, Hyundai Ioniq 5, Hyundai Kona, Toyota bZ4x,  Volvo XC40, and Nissan Ariya, Ford Mach-e and Cadillac Lyriq EV chargers

Charge times and charge costs can vary greatly depending on three main factors: –

  1. Power acceptance of the car’s battery.  How fast the car can “accept” the charge from the EV charger
  2. EV charger speed
  3. Time of day (or night) for charging

Based on the car type, we identify below the optimum portable EV charger for your Kia Niro, Kia EV 6, Hyundai Ioniq 5, Hyundai Kona, Toyota bZ4x, Nissan Ariya, Ford Mach-e, and Cadillac Lyriq and Volvo XC 40 EV Chargers, as well as the charge costs for different times of the day.  

We recommend the fastest chargers such as the NEMA 14-50 or NEMA 6-50 Level 2 40 am, 9.6 kWh EV chargers since they are the most powerful chargers, will reduce range anxiety and allow EV owners to charge exclusively during super off-peak and off-peak hours when power is cheapest.   EV charging during these times can reduce your electricity bill by hundreds of dollars per month

 

Recommended EV Charger

Level 2 Power Settings Charge Times

EV Type

40 amp, 9.6 kwh charge time

32 amp, 7.7 kwh charge time

24 amp, 5.8 kwh charge time

Product Link 

https://ev-chargers.com/nema-14-50/product-119/

https://ev-chargers.com/nema-14-50/product-119/

https://ev-chargers.com/nema-14-30/product-114/

Cadillac Lyriq 

10:25

13:09

17:14

Chevrolet Bolt EUV  

8:47

8:47

11:12

Hyundai Ioniq 5 67 kWh battery  

6:58

8:48

11:33

Hyundai Ioniq 5 72 kWh battery  

6:02

7:37

10:00

Hyundai Ioniq (plug in hybrid)

2:41

2:41

1:32

Hyundai Ioniq Electric 

4:14

4:14

4:49

Hyundai Kona (Standard Range)

5:50

5:50

7:14

Hyundai Kona Long Range 

8:36

8:36

10:41

Kia EV 6 Light 

6:02

7:37

10:00

Kia EV 6 Wind

7:42

9:44

12:45

Kia EV 6 GT

7:42

9:44

12:45

Kia Niro 

8:38

8:38

11:02

Kia Optima (Plug-in Hybrid) 

2:58

2:58

1:41

Nissan Ariya Venture+

12:05

12:05

15:00

Nissan Ariya Evolve+

8:45

8:45

10:51

Nissan Ariya Premier

8:45

8:45

10:51

Nissan Ariya Platinum

8:45

8:45

10:51

Nissan Leaf Pure 60 kwh battery 

9:05

9:05

10:20

Nissan Leaf 40 kwh battery 

6:03

6:03

6:53

Toyota bZ4x 

10:45

10:45

12:14

Toyota Rav4 Prime Plug in hybrid  

2:44

2:44

3:07

Volkswagen ID. 4 

8:01

10:07

13:16

Volvo XC40 Recharge (Plug in Hybrid)

7:05

10:15

13:26

Volvo XC40 Recharge (Pure Electric)

2:58

2:58

1:50

 

 

 

Charging Costs 0% to 100% full battery

EV Type

Super off peak charge cost  

Off Peak charge Cost  

Peak Charge Cost  

Product Link 

$0.16 cents/kWh

$0.27 cents/kWh

$0.43/kWh

Cadillac Lyriq 

$16

$27

$43

Chevrolet Bolt EUV  

$10

$18

$28

Hyundai Ioniq 5 67 kWh battery 

$11

$18

$29

Hyundai Ioniq 5 72 kWh battery 

$9

$16

$25

Hyundai Ioniq (plug in hybrid)

$1

$2

$4

Hyundai Ioniq Electric 

$4

$8

$12

Hyundai Kona (Standard Range)

$7

$11

$18

Hyundai Kona Long Range 

$10

$17

$27

Kia EV 6 Light 

$9

$16

$25

Kia EV 6 Wind

$12

$20

$32

Kia EV 6 GT

$12

$20

$32

Kia Niro 

$10

$17

$28

Kia Optima (Plug-in Hybrid) 

$2

$3

$4

Nissan Ariya Venture+

$14

$23

$37

Nissan Ariya Evolve+

$10

$17

$27

Nissan Ariya Premier

$10

$17

$27

Nissan Ariya Platinum

$10

$17

$27

Nissan Leaf 60 kwh battery 

$10

$16

$26

Nissan Leaf 40 kwh battery 

$6

$11

$17

Toyota bZ4x 

$11

$19

$31

Toyota Rav4 Prime Plug in hybrid  

$3

$5

$8

Volkswagen ID. 4 

$12

$21

$33

Volvo XC40 Recharge (Plug in Hybrid)

$12

$21

$34

Volvo XC40 Recharge (Pure Electric)

$2

$3

$5

 

If you don’t see your vehicle and would like to know the recommended EV charger or charge costs, please email us at info@ev-chargers.com

EV Chargers provide different charging times depending on the type of charger and your plug at home. Level 1 chargers are generally 3 pin plug chargers with much slower charge times. Level 2 chargers are generally 4 pin plug chargers with more power so will charge more quickly.

Yes a Level 2 charger is worth the extra premium (generally $150-$200). This is because it provides a much faster charge time for your vehicle and can reduce charge times by around 50% depending on the type of car you have.

Over the years, the U.S. market has had many different types of 240V plugs and there is no standard.  There are some that are more common than others and that are generally recommended.  We offer different plugs for different receptacles:

NEMA 14-30 (30A plug) – This is most commonly used for electric clothes dryers.  It’s installed onto a dedicated 30A circuit to match the rating of the plug. 

NEMA 14-50 (50A plug). This is commonly used for electric ovens and is often found in RV parks and campgrounds. It’s installed onto a dedicated 50A circuit to match the rating of the plug.

NEMA 6-50 (50A plug). This is common for welders or plasma cutters. It’s installed onto a dedicated 50A circuit to match the rating of the plug.

Please go to our selector tool. https://evchargersusa.comev-charger-selector-tool/    We lay out the best charging options based on your vehicle battery size and acceptance.

The first type of plug, called a Type 1, is used by most cars and trucks made in North America. This is also known as an SAE J1772 connector. It looks like this:

The second type of plug, known as a Type 2 or Mennekes connector, is used by many Asian brands such as Nissan Leaf and Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV.

Lastly there’s the Tesla Supercharger which allows for high-speed charging – delivering up to 120 kW from a single car charger with no reduction in battery performance or capacity over time.

Most early production EV vehicles were fitted with a 3.6KW onboard charger as standard, which best matched a 16 amp cable.  More recent models have 7KW onboard charge capability which require a 32amp cable.  Please refer to our EV Selector tool.  https://evchargersusa.comev-charger-selector-tool/  We match the KW battery charge acceptance rate (kW) with your car to provide the right charger.

Yes, all US electric and plug-in hybrid cars use a Type 1 connector. This is sometimes referred to as an SAE J1772. The Type 1 (SAE JA772) plugs support Level 1 and Level 2 charging standards. Using our EV chargers you will be able to charge all Electric cars and Plug Hybrids including Ford, Tesla, Nissan and Mercedes.

Yes.  A 240 volt charger can typically provide a 32 amp or 40 max charging current.   This equates to a 9.6kW max power delivery per hour (or 240V x 40A = 9,600 watts or 9.6 kW).

You do not.  We did that for so you can pick the best charger using our ev charger selector tool https://evchargersusa.comev-charger-selector-tool/

Yes.  The EV charger will not charge faster than the maximum charging capacity/on-board battery acceptance charge rate of the car.   The benefit of this is futureproofing your charging with a more powerful charger for your next car to save purchasing another charger.  The EV charger controls the charge and will only take in the power it is made to accept.

You need to check the on-board battery charge capability of your car and the source of the power you’re charging from. You can only charge at the battery charge rate that your car can take (kW acceptance rate) and at the amp rate the power source is providing.  For example,  Nissan Leaf models have a 3.3 (kW) acceptance rate so even though you have a 32 amp cable, which pushes out 7.4kW, the battery can only accept 3.3kW.

One of the most popular EV charger related questions we receive is which is the right EV charger and how much will an EV charge cost if I use that EV charger.  With the introduction in 2021, 2022 and 2023 of a large number of all electric EVs such as the Kia EV6, the Hyundai Ioniq 5, the Ford mach-e, the Nissan Ariya and the Volkswagen ID.4, this has become a hot topic.

There are 3 main variables when deciding the right portable EV charger that will determine the charge times, charge costs and overall cost of ownership:-

  1. On board ac charge acceptance.  Power acceptance of the car and how fast the car can “accept” the charge 
  2. EV charger speed, typically expressed in kilowatt hours (kwh) since battery size are expressed in the same unit
  3. Time of day (or night) for charging

We created two tables showing typical charge speeds for recently launched EVs.  We included recommended EV charger power level for Cadillac Lyriq, Chevrolet Bolt, Hyundai Ioniq, Kia EV 6, Nissan Ariya, Toyota bZ4x, Toyota Rav 4, Volkwagen ID.4 and Volvo XC 40. 

We recommend the fastest chargers such as the NEMA 14-50 or NEMA 6-50 level 2 40 am, 9.6 kWh EV chargers as they are most powerful, will reduce range anxiety (by ensuring a full charge in between trips) and allow EV owners to charge most of their battery during super off peak and off-peak hour.  Power is typically 30% to 40% cheaper at super off peak compared to peak.   EV charging during off peak and super off peak can reduce your electricity bill by thousands of dollars over one year

 

Recommended EV Charger

Level 2 Power Settings Charge Times

EV Type

40 amp, 9.6 kwh charge time

32 amp, 7.7 kwh charge time

24 amp, 5.8 kwh charge time

Product Link 

 

 

https://evchargersusa.com/ev-charger-selector-tool/

 

Cadillac Lyriq 

10:25

13:09

17:14

Chevrolet Bolt EUV  

8:47

8:47

11:12

Hyundai Ioniq 5 67 kWh battery  

6:58

8:48

11:33

Hyundai Ioniq 5 72 kWh battery  

6:02

7:37

10:00

Hyundai Ioniq (plug in hybrid)

2:41

2:41

1:32

Hyundai Ioniq Electric 

4:14

4:14

4:49

Hyundai Kona (Standard Range)

5:50

5:50

7:14

Hyundai Kona Long Range 

8:36

8:36

10:41

Kia EV 6 Light 

6:02

7:37

10:00

Kia EV 6 Wind

7:42

9:44

12:45

Kia EV 6 GT

7:42

9:44

12:45

Kia Niro 

8:38

8:38

11:02

Kia Optima (Plug-in Hybrid) 

2:58

2:58

1:41

Nissan Ariya Venture+

12:05

12:05

15:00

Nissan Ariya Evolve+

8:45

8:45

10:51

Nissan Ariya Premier

8:45

8:45

10:51

Nissan Ariya Platinum

8:45

8:45

10:51

Nissan Leaf Pure 60 kwh battery 

9:05

9:05

10:20

Nissan Leaf 40 kwh battery 

6:03

6:03

6:53

Toyota bZ4x 

10:45

10:45

12:14

Toyota Rav4 Prime Plug in hybrid  

2:44

2:44

3:07

Volkswagen ID. 4 

8:01

10:07

13:16

Volvo XC40 Recharge (Plug in Hybrid)

7:05

10:15

13:26

Volvo XC40 Recharge (Pure Electric)

2:58

2:58

1:50

 

 

Charging Costs 0% to 100% full battery

EV Type

Super off peak charge cost  

Off Peak charge Cost  

Peak Charge Cost  

Product Link 

$0.16 cents/kWh

$0.27 cents/kWh

$0.43/kWh

Cadillac Lyriq 

$16

$27

$43

Chevrolet Bolt EUV  

$10

$18

$28

Hyundai Ioniq 5 67 kWh battery 

$11

$18

$29

Hyundai Ioniq 5 72 kWh battery 

$9

$16

$25

Hyundai Ioniq (plug in hybrid)

$1

$2

$4

Hyundai Ioniq Electric 

$4

$8

$12

Hyundai Kona (Standard Range)

$7

$11

$18

Hyundai Kona Long Range 

$10

$17

$27

Kia EV 6 Light 

$9

$16

$25

Kia EV 6 Wind

$12

$20

$32

Kia EV 6 GT

$12

$20

$32

Kia Niro 

$10

$17

$28

Kia Optima (Plug-in Hybrid) 

$2

$3

$4

Nissan Ariya Venture+

$14

$23

$37

Nissan Ariya Evolve+

$10

$17

$27

Nissan Ariya Premier

$10

$17

$27

Nissan Ariya Platinum

$10

$17

$27

Nissan Leaf 60 kwh battery 

$10

$16

$26

Nissan Leaf 40 kwh battery 

$6

$11

$17

Toyota bZ4x 

$11

$19

$31

Toyota Rav4 Prime Plug in hybrid  

$3

$5

$8

Volkswagen ID. 4 

$12

$21

$33

Volvo XC40 Recharge (Plug in Hybrid)

$12

$21

$34

Volvo XC40 Recharge (Pure Electric)

$2

$3

$5

 

Don’t see your vehicle?  Please let us know at info@ev-chargers.com and we can provide your information

NEMA 14-30 EV Chargers

A frequent question we are asked at EV Chargers is if a NEMA 14-30 EV Charger is a good option.  The answer is nearly always yes.     Anyone who lives in the U.S. will have likely seen a NEMA 14-30 socket.  Now that EV charging is becoming more mainstream, plug types such as NEMA 14-50 and NEMA 14-30 EV charging are increasingly being understood.   NEMA relates to the specification of a plug and with the growth of electric vehicles, more homeowners are tapping into these sockets as EV plugs for their electric vehicle charging.

We sell many NEMA 14-30 EV chargers particularly for Kia, Hyundai, Volvo, Nissan, MINI Toyota and Ford.

  • You often have these already installed in the garage or in other accessible areas
  • Charging can start immediately without having to wait on plug installs or panel upgrades  
  • Offers level 2, 240-volt powerful charging without the costs and disruption of installs
  • More cost effective compared to 14-50 EV chargers and a lot faster than level 1 EV Chargers
  • You may move it more easily if circumstances change
  • It is not hardwired into the panel, which requires more extensive work and an electrician (also harder to move)
  • The current 14-30 plug location may not be well suited for a larger wall box
  • The cable lengths on portable 14-30 EV chargers are generally longer than wall box chargers
  • The technology such as delayed charging and charging information is now on most car apps

This socket replaced the traditional NEMA 10-30 which was used traditionally for dyers. It is estimated to be in 50 million+ of U.S garages so there is a reasonable probability that you do have a NEMA 14-30 already.   Avoid companies selling 10-30 EV chargers, which is common on 3rd party seller sites.  These are against electrical codes and are a major electrical hazard.

It can fully charge a long-range (over 230 miles) EV in 8-11 hours depending on battery size.  For example, a Kia EV 6 all electric (standard battery size 58 kWh), will charge in exactly 10 hours from empty and 5 hours from a 50% battery (in practice when most EV owners will charge up to avoid range anxiety).

Yes, especially on vehicles prior 2020 when most companies supplied a level 1 “trickle charger.  Many manufacturers still do not always provide an EV charger such as Hyundai or Kia.

It is 24amps or 5.8 kW.   The plug and often the circuit is 30 amps, but the charger should only pull around 80% of the available power to avoid tripping the breaker.  Avoid companies that market 28 amp or 30-amp chargers as it will frequently trip the breaker since breakers are not designed to run at their full capacity on a continuous load. 

NEMA 14 30 Socket

At EV-Chargers™ our mission is to make the complex more simple and to reduce the jargon in the EV industry.  Please use our EV-Selector tool and in 3 clicks we can recommend the right level 1 or level 2 ev charger for you at https://evchargersusa.com/ev-charger-selector-tool/.  You will see the NEMA 14-30 plug on that page

Note: This FAQ section was not written by an electrician.  It is intended to provide an overview and explanation of NEMA 14-30 in the context of EV chargers .  The article is not intended to be construed as electrical advice or to replace advice and consultation with a certified licensed electrician, which is highly recommended